If that's not enough, check out the books. Gossip Girls is one of the most popular romance series for girls ages 12-16. Published by Simon and Schuster, recurring themes are incest and graphic sex among children. What about some of the books our kids are reading for school assigned reports? When I was researching Home Invasion, I decided to thumb through a few books from a list of those recommended by the American Library Association for ages 12-14. Well, I pulled a few novels off the [library's] shelves and what I found disgusted me. One described a sexual encounter between fourth graders. Another was written from the perspective of a 14 year-old boy who describes, in detail, watching his first homosexual encounter. In one book, you only need to get to page four for the first of many uses of the term "motherf—-in". Of course, you should also check out the Sex Ed class materials that may include contests where kids race to put condoms on dildos and cucumbers.

3. A girl uses her physical beauty as her currency and basis of value. A girl may be so used to feeling validated through her looks and sexuality, that she uses this as her primary tool to get what she wants in life. A woman, knows her worth is beyond her physicality. A woman bases her value on her intelligence, her strength, her integrity, her values, her contributions, her humanity.
Mmmmm I’m inclined to agree that “seeing someone” is the more “serious” phrasing. Like, “dating” is you’re going on DATES. But SEEING them means that you see them frequently in situations that aren’t typically considered DATES, for instance, you go to Trader Joe’s together because you both need groceries! Or you accompany them to eviction court! (yes, I’ve done that, true story). That’s way more serious than the ol’ coffee & museum “dating” thing!
My boyfriend and I, both 22, met at school. He is Caucasian from an upper-middle-class family; I'm a minority from a lower-middle-class family. After college, I immediately found a position as a server, held out for an internship that valued my education, and got a regular babysitting job to help support myself and begin saving. He expected a permanent higher-level position immediately and turned down a six-month, full-time paid internship. While I was at work, he would send out applications and wait for me to come home or go on adventures with friends. I was jealous of his time with our friends—and then felt selfish for feeling that way. He is now working for his family business, and I have a nine-to-five job, so we still don't see each other until night, when we are both exhausted. I feel I have lost the spark I had for him when we were in school, and I want it back.
Historically, marriages in most societies were arranged by parents and older relatives with the goal not being love but legacy and "economic stability and political alliances", according to anthropologists.[5] Accordingly, there was little need for a temporary trial period such as dating before a permanent community-recognized union was formed between a man and a woman. While pair-bonds of varying forms were recognized by most societies as acceptable social arrangements, marriage was reserved for heterosexual pairings and had a transactional nature, where wives were in many cases a form of property being exchanged between father and husband, and who would have to serve the function of reproduction. Communities exerted pressure on people to form pair-bonds in places such as Europe; in China, society "demanded people get married before having a sexual relationship"[6] and many societies found that some formally recognized bond between a man and a woman was the best way of rearing and educating children as well as helping to avoid conflicts and misunderstandings regarding competition for mates.
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