^ Jason Fell (August 9, 2011). "Wingman Businesses Cash in on Men's Dating Dilemmas". Entrepreneur. Retrieved 2010-10-25. Donovan says he has collected information on more than 500 businesses worldwide that offer dating coach services -- with almost 350 of those operating in the U.S. And the number of these businesses has surged since 2005, following Neil Strauss' New York Times bestselling book The Game.
Chinese-style flirtatiousness is termed sajiao (Chinese: 撒娇; pinyin: sājiāo), best described as "to unleash coquettishness" with feminine voice, tender gestures, and girlish protestations.[91] Chinese women expect to be taken care of (Chinese: 照顾; pinyin: zhàogu) by men like a baby girl is doted on by an attentive and admiring father.[91] They wish to be almost "spoiled" (Chinese: 惯; pinyin: guàn) by a man buying gifts, entertainment, and other indulgences.[91] It's a positive sign of heartache (Chinese: 心疼; pinyin: xīnténg) when a man feels compelled to do "small caring things" for a woman without being asked such as pouring a glass of water or offering a "piggyback ride if she's tired."[91] These are signs of love and accepted romantic notions in China, according to one source.[91]
A girl doesn’t know what she wants because she is scared. She is comfortable being closed off because she isn’t mature enough to fight her fears in order to find herself. She uses others to her convenience because she is afraid to risk. Closing herself prevents her from experiencing real feelings therefore she remains false, bound, selfish and dependent and she looks for independence everywhere but within.
Chicago, Los Angeles, Houston, Phoenix, San Antonio, San Diego, San Francisco, Fort Worth, Seattle, Portland, Las Vegas, Miami, Tampa, Anaheim, Greensboro, Henderson, Jersey, Orlando, Laredo, Durham, Glendale, Abbotsford, Chicoutimi, Halifax, Kingston, London, Albany, Adelaide, Bowral, Brisbane, Canberra, Belfast, Leicester, Leicester, Liverpool, London
Generally, during much of recorded history of humans in civilization, and into the Middle Ages in Europe, weddings were seen as business arrangements between families, while romance was something that happened outside of marriage discreetly, such as covert meetings.[7] The 12th-century book The Art of Courtly Love advised that "True love can have no place between husband and wife."[7] According to one view, clandestine meetings between men and women, generally outside of marriage or before marriage, were the precursors to today's dating.[7]
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