As many of you know, my wife Sue and I have been married for more than thirty years. We have a daughter who is 27, and we have two grandsons. We have a daughter who is 25, and is single. Our son is 17, and of course, he is single as well. The reason I mention that, for those of you who did not know, is that the subject which I have to talk to you about today is one that I have been thinking about for many years. I have been back and forth, so to speak, on how to approach the subject. In the last year or so, we have had a lot of questions about this subject—so many questions that I thought it was important to speak on it. This subject directly affects my family, and has directly, or is directly, affecting anyone that is at least 16 years old. I think you will find this subject interesting. Please do not tune out if you think it is not directed to you because there are principles in it we can all learn from. The subject in one word is "Dating."
Young people engaging in premarital sex are acting like sheep to the slaughter, totally oblivious to the real facts of life. Dating should be preceded by wholesome group activities; God created us as social beings, placing a longing in each individual for a member of the opposite sex. The purpose of dating should not be considered merely a pre-marriage ritual designed to prepare one for marriage, but instead (1) to develop wholesome interactions with the opposite sex in contrast to the world's dating games, totally mired in the lures of temptation and emotion described by James 1:14-15; (2) to help individuals to see their own strengths and weaknesses, gradually understanding themselves; (3) to develop practice in serving others, and (4) to discover the person one will marry. The more similarities there are in a relationship, the less likelihood that conflicts will emerge. A key ingredient in the dating process is faith in God's purpose in each person's life. The relationship one has with God takes precedence over any relationship with any other human being.
When on a blind date, neither party knows the other before they meet at the agreed destination. This arrangement often involves group dating. For example, a friend of yours brings along another person who will be your date for the evening. When meeting a blind date on a one-to-one basis, it’s advisable to choose a public venue with plenty of other people around, in case the date turns out badly.
Dating after marriage is very important because it gives you exclusive time with your wife (which might not happen during the rest of the week). While dating, you have her attention and she has yours. You can use this time to catch each other up on what has happened in the week, observe how the other person may have changed recently, have important conversations, and make decisions. It’s also important to have fun too! Having fun together deepens the relationship. (Also read: 10 Fun Date Night Ideas)
There is evidence that couples differ in the pace and timing with which they initiate sex in their relationships. Studies show that approximately 50% of premarital young adult couples become sexually involved within the first month of dating, while 25% initiate sex one to three months after beginning to date and a small proportion of couples wait until marriage before initiating sexual relations.[145]

There is concern that young people's views of marriage have changed because of economic opportunities, with many choosing deliberately not to get married,[88] as well as young marrieds who have decided not to have children, or to postpone having them.[89] Cohabiting relationships are tolerated more often.[6] Communities where people live but do not know each other well are becoming more common in China like elsewhere, leading to fewer opportunities to meet somebody locally without assistance.[89] Divorce rates are rising in cities such as Shanghai, which recorded 27,376 divorces in 2004, an increase of 30% from 2003.[89]
Matthew 20:25-28 But Jesus called them to Himself and said, "You know that the rulers of the Gentiles lord it over them, and those who are great exercise authority over them. Yet it shall not be so among you; but whoever desires to become great among you, let him be your servant. And whoever desires to be first among you, let him be your slave—just as the Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give His life a ransom for many."
Marriage is a formal, long-term commitment, where you and your partner agree to be together as a couple for the rest of your lives. The same way a good house must have a strong foundation, your marriage must be based on a solid foundation. You'll need to acquire knowledge of your partner and skills like communication and compromise in order to form a stable and successful marriage. You can start learning a lot of this just when you two are dating. For instance, you'll start getting a better understanding of each other’s attitudes and temperament by spending time together on dates. You'll also start to learn how to work past your differences. This understanding is vital because it helps you to work together as a team once you get married.

6. A girl cannot be bothered with anything domestic and is proud of the fact that she cannot cook or clean. A woman understands that being domestic is not a duty, but understands that it is one way of taking care of herself and others. She also understands that in the event she wants to create a family, having a person in the household who can contribute domestically is important.


Journalist Emily Witt in 2016 wrote that while "social mores had changed to accept a wider range of sexual practices", there was still much "loneliness and anxiety".[144] She traveled to San Francisco and began dating a lot, using Internet dating services and apps, and sometimes going to singles' bars alone, only to find that the "romantic-comedy concept of love" with a "perfect, permanent, tea-for-two ending" was not going to happen to her.[144]
Dating after marriage is very important because it gives you exclusive time with your wife (which might not happen during the rest of the week). While dating, you have her attention and she has yours. You can use this time to catch each other up on what has happened in the week, observe how the other person may have changed recently, have important conversations, and make decisions. It’s also important to have fun too! Having fun together deepens the relationship. (Also read: 10 Fun Date Night Ideas)
You alone can add up the plusses and minuses to determine whether this is the only relationship you want in your life. Does it exact too high a cost to your full personhood? It's nice to think that you've found your heart's desire, especially when work leaves little room for a social life, but premature closure could bring a lifetime of unhappiness. Maybe you and your boyfriend need a six-month time-out to date others; you might discover there are potential partners who bring a better blend of qualities to a relationship.

We are number 22, there are no doubts about that. Cindy, she is my sweetheart. I have known her for ten years now and she is the only one I think of. I don’t know if you’ll understand me, she is my Juliet, my only true love. I would do anything for her. But I feel that she is pulling away from me. I don’t know why, as I haven’t done anything wrong. Oh what should I do, guys? Should I tell her my fears or just pretend I don’t notice her distant behaviour? Help!
In Paris, a man I considered to have dated a few weeks (he was adamant we were in a relationship), told me, "Either you're having casual sex, or you're in a relationship. That's it". My next question, "Well, then how did you know you wanted a relationship with me?" He laughed. "From the second I saw your picture online and sent you a message, we were in a relationship. I stopped talked to other girls. I stopped messaging them. And I asked you to meet me on the Seine". 

All of these are examples of gender stereotypes which plague dating discourse and shape individuals' and societies' expectations of how heterosexual relationships should be navigated. In addition to the detrimental effects of upholding limited views of relationships and sexual and romantic desires, stereotypes also lead to framing social problems in a problematic way. For example, some have noted that educated women in many countries including Italy and Russia, and the United States find it difficult to have a career as well as raise a family, prompting a number of writers to suggest how women should approach dating and how to time their careers and personal life. The advice comes with the assumption that the work-life balance is inherently a "woman's problem." In many societies, there is a view that women should fulfill the role of primary caregivers, with little to no spousal support and with few services by employers or government such as parental leave or child care. Accordingly, an issue regarding dating is the subject of career timing which generates controversy. Some views reflect a traditional notion of gender roles. For example, Danielle Crittenden in What Our Mothers Didn't Tell Us argued that having both a career and family at the same time was taxing and stressful for a woman; as a result, she suggested that women should date in their early twenties with a seriousness of purpose, marry when their relative beauty permitted them to find a reliable partner, have children, then return to work in their early thirties with kids in school; Crittenden acknowledged that splitting a career path with a ten-year baby-raising hiatus posed difficulties.[48] There are contrasting views which suggest that women should focus on careers in their twenties and thirties. Columnist Maureen Dowd quoted comedian Bill Maher on the subject of differing dating agendas between men and women: "Women get in relationships because they want somebody to talk to -- men want women to shut up."[49]


Generally, during much of recorded history of humans in civilization, and into the Middle Ages in Europe, weddings were seen as business arrangements between families, while romance was something that happened outside of marriage discreetly, such as covert meetings.[7] The 12th-century book The Art of Courtly Love advised that "True love can have no place between husband and wife."[7] According to one view, clandestine meetings between men and women, generally outside of marriage or before marriage, were the precursors to today's dating.[7]
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